Imitative writing assessment rubrics

In art class, even though the ability to generate ideas is central to the process of art and central to the success of artists, many art teachers do not realize that idea generation can be intentionally taught. We fail to divulge these secrets to our students. I have known a few art teachers that did teach idea generation, but only used one method of generating ideas. Too often, we expect students to produce art products before we teach them how to get ideas for the products.

Imitative writing assessment rubrics

Variety of ideas and contexts Ideas represent a startling variety of important concepts from different contexts or disciplines. Ideas represent important concepts from different contexts or disciplines. Ideas represent important concepts from the same or similar contexts or disciplines.

Ideas do not represent important concepts. Variety of sources Created product draws on a wide variety of sources, including different texts, media, resource persons, or personal experiences. Created product draws on a variety of sources, including different texts, media, resource persons, or personal experiences.

Created product draws on a limited set of sources and media.

imitative writing assessment rubrics

Created product draws on only one source or on sources that are not trustworthy or appropriate. Combining ideas Ideas are combined in original and surprising ways to solve a problem, address an issue, or make something new.

Ideas are combined in original ways to solve a problem, address an issue, or make something new. Ideas are combined in ways that are derived from the thinking of others for example, of the authors in sources consulted.

Ideas are copied or restated from the sources consulted. Communicating something new Created product is interesting, new, or helpful, making an original contribution that includes identifying a previously unknown problem, issue, or purpose.

Created product is interesting, new, or helpful, making an original contribution for its intended purpose for example, solving a problem or addressing an issue. Created product serves its intended purpose for example, solving a problem or addressing an issue. Created product does not serve its intended purpose for example, solving a problem or addressing an issue.

Brookhart, Alexandria, VA: Copyright by ASCD. Generating a grade is not the intended purpose of the rubric for creativity.

Stimulating Creative Thinking

Rubrics help clarify criteria for success and show what the continuum of performance looks like, from low to high, from imitative to very creative. I do not recommend grading creativity. Another advantage of the rubric for creativity is that it functions as a visual organizer that makes us consider creativity apart from the other criteria for the work.

For example, in the acrostic poem assignment, other criteria might include the quality of the ideas conveyed, word choice and use, and correct application of the acrostic format.

Still, taking a step back from the work and focusing on its creativity allows for the kind of feedback missing in those opening classroom examples.

Start by helping students understand what creativity is, using rubrics, examples, and discussion about these. Then give feedback on the level of creativity you observe in their work. In the example of the acrostic poem, the teacher might have coached the girl to work with more originality, explaining that her work was very much like many other poems and challenging her to write a poem that was less like those of others.

The boy needed to know that his use of unique personality terms—such as aggressive and nutty—was creative and poetically skilled. In these cases, a few words of feedback to each student would probably have sufficed.

The important thing is to say the words—to name, note, encourage, and value the creativity in the work. Teachers can give more complex feedback on more complex assignments.

What Is Creativity?

For example, in the write-a-melody music assignment, some melodies will sound very much like themes that other composers have written.

Pointing out those similarities and asking for more differences may be useful. They could also brainstorm fresh ways they might have approached the problem, written the poem, and so on.• Analytic rubrics result initially in several scores, followed by a summed total score - their use represents assessment on a multidimensional level (Mertler, ).

Since imitative writing is all about the correct way to form words and letters, this is a great example of how well a student can write. Most of the letters of the common letters in the alphabet are present so the students will receive a lot of practice with those.

31) may support teachers and students in assessing creativity (Brookhart, ). The rubric describes four levels of creativity— very creative, creative, ordinary/routine, and imitative —in four different areas—variety of ideas, variety of sources, novelty of idea combinations, and novelty of communication.

K Writing - Assessment holistic rubrics, rubrics with primary trait and analytic scoring) of writing samples 3.

Summative Assessment (standardized assessments) 4. Instructionally-based Writing Portfolios Student performance on measures of reading may . Writing Assessments Assessing students’ progress as writers of information, opinion/argument and narrative on-demand texts. This October, Heinemann will release Writing Pathways, a book and collection of resources by Lucy Calkins with TCRWP colleagues (especially Audra Kirshbaum Robb and Kelly Boland Hohne).

Controlling for previous writing ability, the group that used the rubrics for self-assessment wrote better overall, and specifically in the areas of ideas, organization, voice, and word choice.

There were no differences between the groups in the areas of sentences and conventions, presumably areas of much previous drill for all young writers.

What Are Rubrics and Why Are They Important?